worklife

How to Have a Blissfully Unproductive Weekend

Getting some much needed rest and relaxation is on my mind (again) — This is one of my struggles as I still can’t find the balance. However, I’ve learned a few times over my working career, and once again as recently as last week, that if you don’t take the time to slow down and rest, your body will do it for you. I’ve been sick the last 13 days — twice! And while I’m starting to finally feel like “myself” I know that I largely got sick because I’d over extended myself for too long.

Still my challenge to overcome so I maintain committed to finding the balance — and sharing with you want I find. I found this great article from Debbie Woodbury with some great tips:

1. Change your mindset, if only for the weekend. If you have a workaholic, productivity-proves-validity mindset, like me, you don’t relax easily. Why not try changing your mindset for just a weekend? Everyone needs time to relax and recharge, and anyone who thinks they are productive 24/7 is just kidding themselves anyway. So go ahead, throw relentless productivity to the wind and resolve to be blissfully unproductive this weekend. You can always go back to being a crazed workaholic on Monday.

2. Unplug from your electronics. Put the stresses and obligations of the workweek on hold by separating yourself from your cell phone, tablet or laptop. Deliberately unplugging makes a statement to yourself and others, “I choose to relax and be blissfully unproductive for a few days.”

Go one step further and seek out silence. As Deepak Chopra said, “Silence is the great teacher, and to learn its lessons you must pay attention to it. There is no substitute for the creative inspiration, knowledge and stability that come from knowing how to contact your core of inner silence.”

3. Stay in the moment. As hard as it is to unplug from your electronics, it’s even harder to unplug from your monkey mind. You know what monkey mind is — the incessant chatter of worry, “shoulds,” “what ifs” and a past/future focus. When the chatter starts building, take a breath and stop. In that moment of awareness, you create a gap that allows you to recognize the noise for what it is, before it takes you away with it. Practicing “catch and release” of your monkey-mind thoughts keeps you present in the here and now and focuses your mind on one thing at a time.

4. Play. Play is not a luxury. Let me repeat. Play is not a luxury. In fact, play is vital to health and increased productivity. Spontaneous play and the fun it elicits are transformative, and happen more often when you’re in the moment. Planning play is as important as planning your meals. And play takes all kinds of forms — run through the sprinkler, have sex, read a fun book, take a hammock nap or just jump up and down! Play doesn’t have to be big and noisy. Play is whatever feeds your soul and makes you feel more alive. Go play!

5. Reconnect with loved ones. Sometimes we’re so overwhelmed with obligations, schedules, responsibilities and appointments that we forget to really be with the people we love. If you turn off the TV, phone and laptop — if you stay in the moment and open yourself to play and fun — guess where you’ll end up? Reconnecting with friends and family!

via 5 Steps to a Blissfully Unproductive Weekend | Debbie Woodbury.

Seems like its just 5 simple things, but some of these are still going to be a real challenge for me. I think I’ll have to take it one at a time and work my way up to all 5 at once :).

Relaxing, relating, and releasing — thanks for joining me on the journey to better work life balance! Making the HR connection, yours

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All Work And No Play Means No Play

I am so lame. This you may have already known if you’ve been a long term reader of my blog 🙂 — but seriously I did the silliest thing ever last week.

About two months ago I brought 2 seats for my and my guy to go see Bill Burr in San Antonio. I was so looking forward to it. We don’t get out much. We haven’t assimilated much into the area and this was something that we would have done from “back home.” I bought our tickets (I even splurged and got ‘the good ones.’ Got excited. And waited for the date to come.

Coincidentally, the last 2 months have been some of the busiest in a long while. You’ve probably noticed that the blog has been a little quieter than normal too right? Its been a lot of late nights and early mornings at the office — long weekends working on projects for work and for other HR projects — but our night out with Bill was coming!

I was working late a couple of Friday nights — I was WAY TOO tired to go out, and figured I would work a bit longer and then go home and crash. And when I got home, I was SO tired that I literally fell asleep with my clothes on. I made it up the stairs, took my shoes off, and feel asleep. Out like a light. I woke up the next morning and checked email and my Facebook. I was greeted by a stream of photos, tweets, and updates from people talking about Bill Burr. Weird. Weird. Weird? What? Wait.. No.. no.. oh no.. seriously.. no way.  Yup. I MISSED the event that I had been looking forward to for months.

I wasn’t mad for the money that I wasted for the event that I didn’t get go to. My sig-o didn’t even remember ( but to be fair, I AM the calendar and he goes where I go). I was annoyed that I was so busy with work that I clearly had not made time for ME! Sounds cliche.  Cue every single work life “out of balance” saying you know out there now.

I’m bummed to have missed Bill Burr. But I’m even more bummed on all those other things that I missed. Don’t get me wrong – I LOVE my work — but October is gonna be all about bringing “balance” back.

Have you ever been “here” before? Let me here your stories?

Tell me I’m not alone 🙂 Thank goodness I have Netflix and can catch Bill there (its not the same, but its a lesson).

Making the HR connection, and fumbling through Netflix, yours,

Your Thoughts on Marissa Mayer banning telecommuting at Yahoo!

While I do think that this is a step in the wrong direction — I not 100% in agreement for some of the discussion. My two cents — work life balance and flexible workplaces are not just a “woman” thing or a thing for “moms” — I don’t have kids yet (unless you want to count my four -legged kiddos) and I want work life balance and flexible work arrangements and my sig-0 wants those things to. Making this just about the message that she’s sending working mothers is a little off to me — I feel that its an easy connection since she’s a woman and a new mother.  IMO, if that’s the only argument that people are making, they are missing the point.

There are tons of studies that show the benefits of flexible work environments and flexible work schedules and how they benefit the bottom line– the question that people SHOULD be asking it — that despite all that evidence that shows that flexible work arrangements are THE THING that drive happy employees, bigger bottom lines, and employee engagement — WHY would she make the decision to steer the company away from that — what does Yahoo! stand to gain?  Is this a statement as to the overall productivity and culture of Yahoo! And speaking of culture — what is the culture at Yahoo like right now — and what has it been like since Mayer took the helm? Questions Questions Questions — I feel like I seriously need more information.

Anyhoo — my two cents — take ’em or leave ’em — my ask of you — get into the discussion and really take a look at both sides of the debate. As for Yahoo! — certainly a story to keep watching as it unfolds — I for one am really interested to see how it all plays out.

Making the HR connection, yours, thegirlinhr!

PS — your thoughts on the nursery that she built adjacent to her office — ingenious or hypocritical?

Why can’t a woman’s place be in the home and the office?

The struggle for work/life balance is back in the spotlight since a recent Yahoo! memo decreed the company’s staff can no longer work from home after June 1.

Parents reacted furiously online, accusing Yahoo! president Marissa Mayer (a new mom herself) of being out-of-touch with working-class families that depend on the flexibility of telecommuting .

Mayer made history last year when she became the youngest female CEO to lead a Fortune 500 company — while five months’ pregnant. Working moms hoped she’d pave the way for a more family-friendly corporate culture.

“We looked at her getting made CEO for a Fortune 500 company and cheered,” says Jennifer Owens, editorial director of Working Mother Media. “We tried to make her our role model.”

But Mayer took just two weeks off at her new gig after having the baby (her former Google employer, in contrast, gives five months’ paid maternity leave) and installed a nursery next to her office — a luxury many working moms could only dream about.

Then came the memo restricting workplace flexibility — from a tech outfit expected to embrace the global workplace beyond the cubicle.

via Marissa Mayer bans telecommuting at Yahoo! and becomes the mother of dissension   – NY Daily News.