recruiter

The Girl in HR gets an HR Demo: DICE Open Web SHRM#13

Today I got a cool demo of Dice’s new Open Web search tool directly from their new president, Shravan Goli (pretty cool!).

Right off the bat, the demo was pretty slick. The neat thing is that recruiters can do a quick and easy search of skills of desired skills — and the search tool serves up candidates and aggregate information about them in a easy to read and usable interface. The information that the tool brings back is all public information, but the catch is that its in ONE place – and finding out more about the candidate is just a click or two away. The search results bring back information about work that they have done, locations that they have worked in, key projects – basically a dynamic resume.

Dice is all about connecting people to find the jobs that they want so they have a powerful engine and information. The impressive thing here is the search engine — they have a great overlap of information that is within their database as well as what is on the web. If you do a Google Search or LinkedIn search, its hard to know who you are looking for or who you are looking for — without going through them all (and think about people with common names). This search could prove to be a very powerful tool — especially for technology professional (and those recruiters who are looking for them). Goli feels that this could be the “next generation” or “gateway” to the way that talent searches may work in the future. Goli relayed a story of conversation that he had with a customer who described Open Web as “sourcing on steroids.”

In summary the tool will deliver deeper profile data, targeted profiles, targeted search, and a single point of access to the web AND it is included in the Dice subscription.

It does focus on the US — that Dice’s main user base and their target market and candidates have to sign in and have a Dice account. So if you’re looking for something global keep that in mind (nothing to suggest though that it couldn’t go that direction, although they were pretty clear that today its US focused).

The Girl in HR’s IMHO: I got a very quick demo and interview with Goli at #SHRM13, but I think that this is some cool and cutting edge stuff — especially in the tech recruiting space. Its certainly worth a deeper dive, particularly if you are already a dice customer.

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How should recruiters spend their time – ERE.net

How would you respond to these points?

  1. Do you want to increase your emphasis on hiring passive candidates?
  2. Are you in a talent scarcity situation where the demand for talent is greater than the supply?
  3. Do you want to raise the talent level of your total current workforce, sustain it, or lower it?

All said they want to accelerate their passive recruiting efforts; they all thought they were in a talent scarcity situation for most critical positions; and, of course, they all said they wanted to raise their talent level. I suggested that to begin achieving these three results they needed to implement a 20/20/60 sourcing plan. This means that no more than 20% of their sourcing resources and efforts should be spent on job postings, about 20% on name generation and targeted emails, and 60% on networking.

This 20/20/60 sourcing plan maps closely to the job-hunting status of LinkedIn members. This is shown in the pie chart summarizing the results of a survey we conducted with LinkedIn last year. Based on more than 4,500 fully-employed members, 17% categorized themselves as active (Searchers, Networkers, and Hunters), 15% Tiptoers (only telling very close former associates), and 68% passive (Explorers were open to receiving calls from a recruiter to discuss a possible career move). To source and recruit the best of these people you can’t just post traditional job descriptions, send boring emails, or make dozens of phones call a day, and expect to attract and hire many good people.

 

The 20/20/60 Sourcing Plan – ERE.net.