Culture

What makes us feel good about our work? #TedTalk

Great talk — and some interesting ideas — things that we should be paying attention to as HR and Business professionals.
What do you think and what are your takeaways?

Making the HR connection, yours,

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Its Not News, Its a Distraction: Happy Ferris Bueller’s Day Off Day

Ah .. one of my favorite movies and one of my all time favorite movie-quotables (see below)– I JUST found out that today was “Happy Ferris Bueller’s Day Off” Day. I’m just coming off an awesome #IHRIM2014 conference, so I was in the office today — but I’ve got it on the calendar for next year.

Thanks to some heroic statistical sleuthing by Baseball Prospectus’s Larry Granillo, we know the date: June 5, 1985.

Granillo pinpointed the date by scrutinizing some fragmented data in the film about the Chicago Cubs game being played during the gang’s trip to Wrigley Field. “It appears obvious now,” writes Granillo, “that this is a real ballgame that Ferris is at, not just something recreated for a film crew. The Harry Caray play-by-play and the Braves players on the field are pretty solid evidence of that. So what game, then, are they watching?” After examining the box scores of games during the Cubs 1985 schedule, he ultimately concludes that it was the June 5, 1985 game against the Atlanta Braves (the visitors won 4-2).

http://www.thewire.com/national/2011/02/your-newest-holiday-june-5th-is-ferris-bueller-s-day-off/17808/

 

Enjoy (and mark your calendars for next year 😉 ) …. and while you’re at it — make time for yourself we all deserve to have our own little Ferris Bueller Day — and you don’t even have to “fake out” your parents or take their car, cut the drama and just schedule the day ;),.

Taking a moment to stop and look around, yours,

 

 

Eight Ways Goofing Off Can Make You More Productive – Forbes

A growing body of research suggests that the longer you keep your rear end in your chair and your eyes glued to your screen, the less productive you may be. Getting up from your desk and moving not only heightens your powers of concentration, it enhances your health.

via Eight Ways Goofing Off Can Make You More Productive – Forbes.

Leave your kids at the park day: Why letting kids play on their own is a good idea.

This Saturday is the fourth annual “Take Our Children to the Park…and Leave Them There Day.”

For real.

The idea is that at around 10 a.m. parents take their kids to—as you might expect from the name of this holiday—their local park. And then they leave them there.

Not if the kids are babies, of course. Not even if they’re toddlers. But if they’re at least seven or eight years old, why NOT leave them there with the other kids gathering? It could be their first chance to finally do that thing we did as kids without thinking twice: Play.

And by “play” I mean: Stand around, get bored, wonder what to do, wish there was an Xbox around, feel hungry, feel a little too hot or cold, feel mad at mom for not organizing something “really” fun, like a trip to Chuck E. Cheese, feel bad all around, realize the other kids are feeling bad too, and then—in desperation—do something.

via Leave your kids at the park day: Why letting kids play on their own is a good idea..

What’s Worse Than a Coworker Who Undermines You? | LinkedIn

In a fascinating study led by Michelle Duffy, police officers filled out a survey about how often their closest colleague undermined and supported them. Officers who felt undermined were less committed at work, experienced more physical health problems, and were more likely to take unauthorized breaks and be absent from work. Being undermined was a major source of stress.

But when the underminer was also supportive, things got worse. The officers experienced even lower commitment, had more health issues, and missed more work. It can actually worse to have a colleague who alternates between Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde than to work with Mr. Hyde all the time. When a colleague is a pure taker, you know what to expect, and you can devise strategies for minimizing your exposure and collaboration. But if that colleague takes in some situations and gives in others, it’s harder to avoid the relationship altogether, and it can be quite unpredictable. As Duffy’s team explains, “it takes more emotional energy and coping resources to deal with individuals who are inconsistent

via What’s Worse Than a Coworker Who Undermines You? | LinkedIn.

Keeping HR from Getting Lost in the Cloud » Employee Engagement, Recognition and Reward Commentary | Globoforce Blog

If Crowdsourcing and Big Data have been two of the top emerging HR themes in 2012, the third member of that trio must certainly be Cloud Computing—in particular cloud-based SaaS solutions for HR.

This emerging trend impacts HR in two significant ways:

HR is streamlining its own processes to create universal HRIS solutions that standardize across national or multinational organizations. Centralizing HR systems and data for HCM and Recognition can offer significant efficiencies and yield the sorts of Big Data I discussed in our last post.

HR is often deeply involved in the adoption and management of organizational collaboration and communication tools, particularly where these solutions impact or are impacted by engagement, workflow, telecommuting and BYOD/privacy policies.

In 2013, the adoption of flexible, centralized cloud-based SaaS solutions will continue to grow in HR and enterprise applications. Many companies struggle with legacy reward or talent management systems that crop up organically in departments or divisions, or hang around long after mergers and acquisitions. These are often management-intensive, manually-tracked systems that do not yield useful data and instead drain company resources. The move to the cloud reins in these efforts and offers:

Lower implementation costs

Easy centralized management and administration

Cutting-edge technology

Free upgrades and enhancements

A way to “future proof” systems

Standardization and equity for all employees across geographies and divisions

Simple tracking and useful, streamlined data

via Keeping HR from Getting Lost in the Cloud » Employee Engagement, Recognition and Reward Commentary | Globoforce Blog.

Your Thoughts on Marissa Mayer banning telecommuting at Yahoo!

While I do think that this is a step in the wrong direction — I not 100% in agreement for some of the discussion. My two cents — work life balance and flexible workplaces are not just a “woman” thing or a thing for “moms” — I don’t have kids yet (unless you want to count my four -legged kiddos) and I want work life balance and flexible work arrangements and my sig-0 wants those things to. Making this just about the message that she’s sending working mothers is a little off to me — I feel that its an easy connection since she’s a woman and a new mother.  IMO, if that’s the only argument that people are making, they are missing the point.

There are tons of studies that show the benefits of flexible work environments and flexible work schedules and how they benefit the bottom line– the question that people SHOULD be asking it — that despite all that evidence that shows that flexible work arrangements are THE THING that drive happy employees, bigger bottom lines, and employee engagement — WHY would she make the decision to steer the company away from that — what does Yahoo! stand to gain?  Is this a statement as to the overall productivity and culture of Yahoo! And speaking of culture — what is the culture at Yahoo like right now — and what has it been like since Mayer took the helm? Questions Questions Questions — I feel like I seriously need more information.

Anyhoo — my two cents — take ’em or leave ’em — my ask of you — get into the discussion and really take a look at both sides of the debate. As for Yahoo! — certainly a story to keep watching as it unfolds — I for one am really interested to see how it all plays out.

Making the HR connection, yours, thegirlinhr!

PS — your thoughts on the nursery that she built adjacent to her office — ingenious or hypocritical?

Why can’t a woman’s place be in the home and the office?

The struggle for work/life balance is back in the spotlight since a recent Yahoo! memo decreed the company’s staff can no longer work from home after June 1.

Parents reacted furiously online, accusing Yahoo! president Marissa Mayer (a new mom herself) of being out-of-touch with working-class families that depend on the flexibility of telecommuting .

Mayer made history last year when she became the youngest female CEO to lead a Fortune 500 company — while five months’ pregnant. Working moms hoped she’d pave the way for a more family-friendly corporate culture.

“We looked at her getting made CEO for a Fortune 500 company and cheered,” says Jennifer Owens, editorial director of Working Mother Media. “We tried to make her our role model.”

But Mayer took just two weeks off at her new gig after having the baby (her former Google employer, in contrast, gives five months’ paid maternity leave) and installed a nursery next to her office — a luxury many working moms could only dream about.

Then came the memo restricting workplace flexibility — from a tech outfit expected to embrace the global workplace beyond the cubicle.

via Marissa Mayer bans telecommuting at Yahoo! and becomes the mother of dissension   – NY Daily News.