Month: June 2013

New Ask.com Study Reveals Workplace Productivity Killers – WSJ.com

Ask.com, a leading online brand for questions and answers, today announced the results of its Office Workplace Productivity study, which reveals the preferences and habits of American office workers when it comes to an optimally productive workplace environment.

Among the key findings: 86 percent of respondents(1) prefer to work alone to hit maximum productivity, suggesting that, while group-oriented workplace perks like foosball and bean bag lounges have become popular tools for unlocking creativity and boosting morale, they don’t always drive efficiency. Additionally, the preference to work from home isn’t as prevalent as it may seem; a majority of respondents prefer to spend “focus time” in their personal workspace (63 percent) as compared to those who’d rather work at home (29 percent).

The study was conducted online by Harris Interactive on behalf of Ask.com among 2,060 adults ages 18 and older in March 2013.

via New Ask.com Study Reveals Workplace Productivity Killers – WSJ.com.

What are some of your top productivity killers? Did they make the list?

New Social Security Cards — May be a Possibility

I was getting ready this morning for day 3 of #shrm13 and heard this story on the news — potentially a revamp of the current social security card. The news immediately got my attention. As an HR person who deals with I-9s and social security cards on almost a daily basis –and have heard all the excuses of employees as to why they don’t have one, or its laminated, or has the wrong name on it, I got a little giddy excitement — a new type of social security card made out of a more study paper and maybe even a chip inside of it — ain’t no shame in calling me a geek — this could be exciting.

Have any unique stories from your employees on why they have to get a replacement social security card?

Yours,

The Girl in HR

The Girl in HR gets an HR Demo: DICE Open Web SHRM#13

Today I got a cool demo of Dice’s new Open Web search tool directly from their new president, Shravan Goli (pretty cool!).

Right off the bat, the demo was pretty slick. The neat thing is that recruiters can do a quick and easy search of skills of desired skills — and the search tool serves up candidates and aggregate information about them in a easy to read and usable interface. The information that the tool brings back is all public information, but the catch is that its in ONE place – and finding out more about the candidate is just a click or two away. The search results bring back information about work that they have done, locations that they have worked in, key projects – basically a dynamic resume.

Dice is all about connecting people to find the jobs that they want so they have a powerful engine and information. The impressive thing here is the search engine — they have a great overlap of information that is within their database as well as what is on the web. If you do a Google Search or LinkedIn search, its hard to know who you are looking for or who you are looking for — without going through them all (and think about people with common names). This search could prove to be a very powerful tool — especially for technology professional (and those recruiters who are looking for them). Goli feels that this could be the “next generation” or “gateway” to the way that talent searches may work in the future. Goli relayed a story of conversation that he had with a customer who described Open Web as “sourcing on steroids.”

In summary the tool will deliver deeper profile data, targeted profiles, targeted search, and a single point of access to the web AND it is included in the Dice subscription.

It does focus on the US — that Dice’s main user base and their target market and candidates have to sign in and have a Dice account. So if you’re looking for something global keep that in mind (nothing to suggest though that it couldn’t go that direction, although they were pretty clear that today its US focused).

The Girl in HR’s IMHO: I got a very quick demo and interview with Goli at #SHRM13, but I think that this is some cool and cutting edge stuff — especially in the tech recruiting space. Its certainly worth a deeper dive, particularly if you are already a dice customer.

#shrm13 Book Preview: A Necessary Evil: Managing Employee Activity on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn …

I got a chance to take a closer look at a great new book specifically geared towards HR professional and social media.  A Necessary Evil: Managing Employee Activity on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn … and the Hundreds of Other Social Media Sites by Aliah D. Wright (@1shrmscribe)

In her book, Aliah takes you through the what, how, and (most importantly) the why of social media in the workplace. Chapters include topics such as:

  • Reconsidering Your Expectations, or All Work and No Play Makes Jack and Jill Dull Employees
  • Why Social Media Engagement is Important, or Why Facebook and Twitter, and LinkedIn Are Not Evil
  • Productivity: Your Perception Might Not Fit Reality
  • Selling Social Media to Your CEO

Aliah partnered and interviewed many of the thought leaders and early adopters of HR social media in order to share their stories, experiences, their lessons learned, and what they are seeing in the workplace throughout the book.

On one thing that really surprised Aliah.. .the idea that some people have, “that they can post or say things on the internet in a vacuum and that ONLY their friends will see it.” Its out there, so we need to know how to deal with it, on a personal AND professional level — as Mike Haberman says, “Its social media, not personal media,”  you’re never entirely sure who is friends with who, who plays bunco with who, whose kid your kid plays little league with — with a click of the button, you can share with your “network” or what networks that is linked to — both in terms of people (friends) and systems (social media platforms).

Another thing that Aliah has learned about people’s social behaviors. Social media can provide an outlet of “I can say this online – but not to your face.” If people are doing it in their personal time its possible that you can deal with it in the work place as well — but don’t let the bad seeds ruin it for everyone — find out the facts, do some research, and understand the phenomenon. I’d recommend, starting with a book like this. I hope to have a full book review up sometime in the coming weeks.

Check out the book via the SHRM bookstore or Amazon.com (book or Kindle available July 1, 20013) — or if you’re at the #shrm13 conference swing on by the onsite conference bookstore!

Happy Reading! Making the HR Connection, yours, The Girl in HR

All #SHRM13 all the time .. or almost

I’m super geeked and excited. The national SHRM conference is quickly approaching and I’m getting ready! My blog over the next few weeks will be primarily, but not entirely, related to activities and experiences that I had in Chicago at SHRM 2013.  Just wanted to give yall a heads up!

Today on the agenda — I’m picking out what sessions I want to attend and what vendors I want to scope out.. and I’m looking forward to re-connecting with some of my friends from around the country! I’m a planner, what can I say! I’ve even got a map of my location and planning out possible activities and things to do and see. I mean, I don’t want to plan out EVERYTHING, but I want to be prepared.

Also — what to wear. Don’t roll your eyes — I know what you’re thinking “Of course the girl is thinking about what to wear… ” Well you’re kinda wrong in your base assumption. My daily threads are pretty casual — like flip flops (despite my research and own blog, I still haven’t given them up) and tshirts kind of casual. I want to be me and comfy, but maybe not so dressed down. Sneakers are a must — I might leave the flip flops in Texas since I think that all that walking and flip flops are a bad combo.

How do you prepare for a conference — and how much thought to you put into what you wear? Do you plan out what vendors and sessions you want to go or do you just wing it?

The Most-Hated Major Company? It’s at the Mall | Michael Santoli – Yahoo! Finance

How can a company go from being so well loved to possible one of the most hated?

Two words — CUSTOMER SERVICE. And you as a manager or HR Pro can help impact that — happy employees have a positive impact on customers.

Sears (sorry I’m spoiling it for ya) has the stuff that people want — and some great products and convenient locations — but the some of the employees don’t seem to care anymore. I love their appliances, tools, home goods, and I’ve bought great children clothes there. But I have noticed that their customer service is a bit lacking.

That being said, I was at a Sears about 4 months ago and had a WONDERFUL experience. I had actually braced myself to have a bad one, but I love Sears tools and appliances and they usually have deals, so I was willing to take the chance of poor service vs. a good deal. I’m so glad that I did! I went in to buy an inexpensive, but reliable gas range for my house that I rent out. I was totally expecting the upsale and to have to look at a bunch of stuff that I wasn’t interested in –or worse, have someone follow me around when all you need is some room to look, breathe, and think — , but this salesman, Eddie,  totally listened to me, got me taken care of ON BUDGET, and in a short amount of time, and got this unit delivered in one of the next open windows. Sorry to hear that Sears might be in this position, but there is hope! I’ll go back to buy other tools and appliances from Eddie for sure!

What are some of your stories of great or bad customer service. Ever had an experience that lead you to never shop somewhere again or an experience that made you loyal forever?

Let me hear your stories!

The Girl in HR!

From Wall Street to the mall, Sears Holdings Inc. (SHLD) might be the most hated major American company.

Sears Roebuck, as the company used to be known, was the Amazon.com (AMZN) of its day, thanks to its comprehensive mail-order catalog and early expansion across fast-growing postwar suburbs. Sears was once so powerful that it built and anchored the largest skyscraper in the country in Chicago (now the Willis Tower).

Yet public affection for storied store brands often doesn’t survive generational shifts, and Sears has been largely rejected by today’s shoppers in favor of newer chains with larger formats and better pricing, from Target Corp. (TGT) to Home Depot Inc. (HD) to Kohl’s Corp. (KSS)

via The Most-Hated Major Company? It’s at the Mall | Michael Santoli – Yahoo! Finance.